STORED PRODUCT PESTS

Moths and beetles can wreak havoc on your food inventory by damaging products, costing you money and customers.

Pests in stored food? Eliminate these unwanted threats.

Often known as pantry pests, moths can infest grain, dried herbs, and natural fiber clothing. Know your options for getting rid of stored food pests in grocery stores, mills, processing plants, or bulk storage facilities.

Thorough inspections of incoming shipments and good storage practices are keys to preventing stored product pest infestations.

KEY RISKS 

Small in size, beetles can go undetected until they chew through packaging or lay eggs in raw materials, damaging stored inventory.

Shutting down production to clean infested equipment in mills, processing plants, and bulk storage facilities wreak havoc on efficiency and your bottom line.

Education

It helps to have a storehouse of knowledge when it comes to managing the pests that invade your stored products.

PLAY HIDE & SEEK.

Stored product pests can be found in box seams, between bags, and under liners or pallets. Indian meal moths often fly near infested products.

LOOK FOR LARVAE.

Seek out the source of moth or beetle infestations by looking for crawling larvae in potential food sources.

ELIMINATE SMALL SNACKS

Stored food pests thrive in the smallest of food sources; spills that accumulate in floor cracks, equipment, hollow posts, and rack joints are particularly vulnerable, so look there for infestations.

DIY TIPS
 

ROTATE STOCK OFTEN.

Rotate stock and remove all out-of-code inventory. Sanitation is key to preventing stored product pests.

ALWAYS BE ON THE LOOKOUT.

Find the infested product and get rid of the pest. Use this table as a guide.

By Jeff Weier & Pat Hottel, published in PCT Guide to Commercial Pest Management, Chapter 20: Pest Management in Food Plants: Dry Processing and Storage Facilities.

FOLLOW THIS CHECKLIST.

Dry and cool climates reduce the risks of a stored product pest infestation, as do proper food maintenance and inspections.

  • Temperature: Between 50°F and 70°F. The cooler the better.
  • Humidity: 15% or less. Consider air conditioning or dehumidification, if needed.
  • Food Rotation: Date products and use the "first in, first out" method.
  • Evidence: Inspect goods carefully for insect evidence before storing.

Mating disruption service is an alternative to fumigation, reduces reliance on pesticides and effectively limits seasonal spikes in insect activity. It's ideal for seed production, shell nut growers, grain storage, raw agricultural commodities and certified organic operations.